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Sober Surf

Sober Surf August 19th - 26th, 2017.

Exclusive Group Limited Availability.

A Word from the Director

jason roderickJason Roderick is a Licensed Clinical Therapist who has worked with men and women in recovery for the past 18 years. He runs a private practice in Providence, Rhode Island. An avid traveler and surfer, Jason has directed experiential programs for over 15 years. He lives with his wife Kelly and son Greyson in Pawtuxet Village, in Warwick, RI.

If you are a frequenter of AA or NA meetings, you might, like me, find those oft-repeated phrases popping up in your head now and then. The “let go, let god” or the “do the next right thing” type line that you have heard a million times, but then one day one seems to hit the right note, come up at the right moment and take on a deeper meaning. For me, I specifically remember getting ready to go off on a three-week solo cycling trip through Southern France. I was exactly one year sober. I was talking to my sponsor and questioning if I was ready to do it. My sponsor simply stated, “You didn’t get sober to be miserable”. Of course, he was right, and while I had heard that same line in plenty of meetings, it took on greater significance at that moment, and I thought of it again and again as I ventured off to some foreign setting to scuba dive, cycle, surf or do whatever it was that drove me at the time.

As a consummate traveler, I often felt that I had to balance my recovery and love for adventure. The two were not necessarily at odds, but often my recovery was compartmentalized on my travels. Maybe I could find a meeting somewhere and maybe not. Maybe I could avoid any uncomfortable situations, but I would always be vigilant. The fact is, travel and recovery didn’t always jibe the way I would have liked.

About four years ago, during a yearly trip to Nosara, I was hanging out on the beach after a sunset session of surfing, and I was feeling that real sense of serenity that encapsulates recovery for me. And this led me to wondering why those two worlds, those two drives-a love of travel and a life based in recovery-could not be present in the same place. Quite simply, this was the impetus for Sober Surf. I have been fortunate to have developed a working relationship and friendship with Tim Marsh from Safari Surf for over seven years now, so I brought my idea to Tim. And in typical Tim fashion, his only question was how we were going to make it the best program we could.

I take pride in my experience directing experiential programs, and in the quality of the programs themselves. I tell my own tale here because I want participants to know that I have a great deal of personal investment in Sober Surf. My goal is to provide participants with an unforgettable experience of surf, yoga and meditation in a beautiful setting shared with others in recovery.